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Thread: Stress on Trucking

  1. #1

    Stress on Trucking

    What kind of stresses are involved in trucking?

  2. #2
    Hi Ben, There are many Stress involved in trucking like Traffic Jams, Truck Breakdowns, Dispatchers, Shippers and Recievers
    Stay Safe
    Manette

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Nette View Post
    Hi Ben, There are many Stress involved in trucking like Traffic Jams, Truck Breakdowns, Dispatchers, Shippers and Recievers
    Although you left out those stupid actions of those four wheelers, and some brother truckers.

  4. #4
    Acknowledged User Glynn's Avatar
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    Hi Ben. Below is a short article that I wrote a week or so ago. Actually it includes stress that drivers experience. Let me know what you think.
    Is My Comparison of Truck Drivers To Boat Captains Valid?
    I hope everyone is off to a great Monday.

    Many of you know that I'm not a truck driver, but I can relate to what you deal with far better than you
    might think. It is a daily occurrence and often many times each day/night you deal with dumb drivers
    that assume you can stop your rig on a dime just like they may think they can stop their BMW!

    Your total weight may be up to 40 tons in some states, but you do have brakes although it may take a while to stop. What if your total weight was
    only 10.5 tons and you had limited steering and no brakes? Such was my life as a boat captain on the Tennessee River. My boat
    was only 43 feet LOA and weighed less than 11 tons, with full fuel tanks and all the necessities my wife and friends demanded along
    with their body weight.

    Invariably when docking and especially when approaching a gas dock, personal watercraft like Sea-Doos would cut in front of me, as though
    I could actually apply brakes! LOL

    Is my comparison of truck drivers to boat captains a reasonable comparison? Probably the biggest difference is that often more lives are at stake on the Interstate than on the Tennessee River and you deal with stopping far more often.

    There is one common charistic of professional truck drivers and experienced boaters, in my opinion.

    They each have respect for others in their profession and are always the first to offer a helping hand when help is really needed.

    Who is generally the first to help a lady with a flat tire, who doesn't have the slightest idea where her car jack is located or what one is?

    Who usually is the hero that pulls a person from a wrecked vehicle as it burst into flames?

    My estimate is that 85% of the time it is a professional truck driver.

    My estimate may be way too low.

    It is also my opinion truck drivers should be awarded medals of honor just like the men and women in the military that risk their lives
    daily to keep our country safe.

    What's your opinion?

  5. #5
    I think it's almost the same. Lives are at stake at the same time. If you don't have even brakes, how can you stop your vehicle. It deals on how professional you are on driving.

  6. #6
    Acknowledged User Glynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ben View Post
    I think it's almost the same. Lives are at stake at the same time. If you don't have even brakes, how can you stop your vehicle. It deals on how professional you are on driving.

    You are so right Ben. Lives are at stake every time a driver gets behind the wheel of a vehicle or vessel. Think of the lives that could be saved if everyone would just think of this each time they hit the road or the waterways. I remember when I once thought I was invincible. That feeling of youthful and invincible feeling returns when I get on a motorcycle. That is the reason I haven't driven a motorcycle in about thirty years. Fortunately, I didn't have an accident, but my type A personality just doesn't mesh with motorcycles. The longer I am on one the faster I want to go. Over a hundred miles an hour on a motorcycle makes a person just like a human projectile. i restrict myself to mopeds on the beach now. Otherwise, I most likely would not be alive to respond
    to your post! Thanks to you and all the other responsible drivers! :-)

  7. #7
    Traffic jams would be the biggest stress for truck drivers.

  8. #8
    Acknowledged User Glynn's Avatar
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    Stress Rel,iever

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob252 View Post
    Traffic jams would be the biggest stress for truck drivers.
    Hi Bob.

    I can't imagine the stress traffic jams can cause for truckers. It certainly affects me just as an ordinary driver of a 4 wheel vehicle.

    Let me also acknowledge how much I appreciate you and other truckers that go above and beyond to drive safely and are often the first responders
    to highway accidents. i had a terrible auto accident years ago. A nice trucker covered me with his flannel shirt and called the TN. State Patrol.

    Part of driver education for non professional drivers should be to understand that a loaded or empty 18 wheeler can't stop like a sports car. They would
    think twice before jumping in front of a trucker and then slamming on brakes thus causing the trucker to apply brakes and downshift. IF THEY ONLY KNEW!!

    I try to have something to take my mind off the traffic jam. Often I listen to CD's and podcast that I have downloaded to my iPhone.
    Over the last few years, I have been fascinated with learning different people's definitions of success, their principles of success and how
    they overcome adversity. If this is of interest to you, send me a message to glynn@motivationhere.com and I will be glad to share how you can
    access the podcast.

    I record the program using Free Conference Call with a live audience. Many of my followers chose to participate in the live recording. Once
    I complete the interview, I open the lines for questions from callers. The program can be accessed via phone or computer using VoIP.

    A few of the individuals I have interviewed are, Gary Guller, the only man with one arm to ever summit Mt.Everest; Brig Sorber, CEO of the
    franchised moving company, Two Men And A Truck. Brig is one of the original "TWo Men"; Major Anthony Bourke, one of twelve F-16 pilots
    circling New York City post 9/11 and founder of Mach 2 Consulting; and Dr. Paul G. Stoltz, author of The Adversity Quotient and GRIT.

    Have a great day and thanks for driving safely! :-)

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