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Thread: Lautenberg to ban super-sized trucks from highways

  1. #1

    Lautenberg to ban super-sized trucks from highways

    U.S. Senator Frank R. Lautenberg (D-NJ) re-introduced legislation designed to keep bigger, heavier trucks off the road. Existing federal truck size and weight limits to the entire National Highway System (NHS) will be applied. Currently these restrictions apply only to interstate highways.

    "When super-sized tractor-trailers are on the road, they are a threat to drivers and the integrity of our highways and bridges," Lautenberg said. "Closing the loophole that keeps these long, overweight trucks on our National Highway System will protect families and preserve our nation's infrastructure. Trucks play a critical role in our nation's economy, but they also share the roads with our families, so we must do everything we can to make our nation's highways safer and prevent tragic accidents. This is thoughtful, common-sense legislation that would maintain our highways, grow our economy, and ensure safe roads for commuters and families."

    The following organizations support the bill: Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, Citizens for Reliable and Safe Highways (CRASH), International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the Trauma Foundation, KidsAndCars.org, the Consumer Federation of America, the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA), AAA, Parents Against Tired Truckers, and the Truck Safety Coalition.

    The "Safe Highways and Infrastructure Preservation Act of 2013" (SHIPA), Lautenberg's bill, would limit of 80,000 pounds and maximum length of 53 feet for tractor-trailer trucks to the entire NHS, while still allowing certain exemptions, including for firefighting equipment. The NHS includes both interstate highways and smaller national highways. Most truck size and weight restrictions already apply to the 44,000-mile Interstate Highway System. The bill would extend certain restrictions to the much bigger 220,000-mile NHS and will also expand the current freeze of triple-tractor trailer operations on interstates to apply to the broader NHS. Furthermore, the bill would close loopholes that allow the operation of overweight trucks and would establish an enforcement program to ensure accountability.

    According to Lautenberg, bigger trucks - both those that are heavier and longer than standard trucks - present safety risks, including longer stopping distances, increased risks of rollover and of trailers swaying into adjacent lanes. Research shows that a 100,000-pound truck with unadjusted brakes travels 25 percent further after the driver steps on the brakes than an 80,000-pound truck. Large trucks account for a disproportionately high share of deaths based on miles traveled compared to standard vehicle traffic. In 2011, 3,757 people died and 88,000 were injured in traffic accidents involving a large truck. In addition, big trucks pose threats to America's roads, bridges, and other infrastructure.

    According to two recent independent polls, more than 72% of Americans oppose efforts to allow heavier trucks on our roads. Additionally, 85% of Americans do not want to pay for the increased damage done by heavier trucks.

    Lautenberg, the Senate's leader on transportation safety, wrote the law that banned triple-trailer "killer trucks" in New Jersey and on most other states' roads.

    The bill is co-sponsored by Senators Robert Menendez (D-NJ), Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and Claire McCaskill (D-MO). Companion legislation is sponsored in the House of Representatives by Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA-3).


    Source: J.J Keller
    ********************
    Drive Carefully & Come Home Safe
    Marie

  2. #2
    I believe he is dead, but maybe his legistrations will die with him. Although I must agree with him on the triples and possibly the double 53". Those I personaly believe are too dangerous to be on the roads. Cant claim personal knowledge of two 53''s although they sound to be, whereas I have personally operated triples and would prefere never to operate them again.

    My only problem with this bill is how, or if, it covers oversized loads? As problematic as they are, they are necessary to take those oversized items to where they are needed.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Menehune View Post
    I believe he is dead, but maybe his legistrations will die with him. Although I must agree with him on the triples and possibly the double 53". Those I personaly believe are too dangerous to be on the roads. Cant claim personal knowledge of two 53''s although they sound to be, whereas I have personally operated triples and would prefere never to operate them again.

    My only problem with this bill is how, or if, it covers oversized loads? As problematic as they are, they are necessary to take those oversized items to where they are needed.
    Yes, he passed away on June 3rd. Thank you for pointing out, Menehune. This news came out May 11 actually. I would agree that trucks with oversized items present higher risks for larger damage.
    ********************
    Drive Carefully & Come Home Safe
    Marie

  4. #4
    Actually, I dont feel that oversized loads present any more risk or larger damage. Is all permits , necessary pace vehicles, and/or routing is done correctly, then I dont see where the problem is. These oversized loads have to take oversized items to their destination. Although safety, and possibility of damage is the responsibility of both the company hauling that load and the state (DOT) who approved that permit. Bearing in mind the state knows its roads better then a out of state company.

  5. #5
    RT Movin' Along bigsemitruckscom's Avatar
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    I believe that trucks are getting to big. They are supersized to the point of being unwieldy, and difficult to manage. If you cant haul it in 86k then make two loads. Loads this big should have to be permited and papered. However the permit routers need to be trained better, but thats a different story....

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